Three Adventist Titans Significance of Heeding or Rejecting the Counsel of Ellen White
Dittes, Albert
   

Today, Seventh-day Adventists are known for their healthcare institutions and their work in the field of medicine, but it wasn’t always that way. In the late 1800s and early 1900s the Adventist Church was still in its infancy, and the medical work was just getting started. As with the introduction of anything new, there were bumps in the road as the church embarked on the work of obeying the divine instruction to combine taking care of physical needs with gospel proclamation. But did the way need to be so rough?

Three Adventist Titans: The significance of heeding or rejecting the counsel of Ellen White examines the lives of three prominent Adventist leaders—John Harvey Kellogg, physician at the Battle Creek Sanitarium; Arthur G. Daniells, president of the General Conference; and Percy Magan, founder of Madison College and later president of the College of Medical Evangelists—who each played an important role in founding the medical and evangelical work of the church.

The book provides an in-depth look at the lives of these three men, their work in the church, their personal communication with Ellen White, their regard for the counsel of the Spirit of Prophecy, and their adherence or rejection of that counsel.